Why I think being a modern man is difficult

Helloo,

I’ve been thinking about men and the things they struggle with. Read to the bottom I’ve attached a documentary by CNN on the topic, veerrrrrry interesting.

Life is hard when you’re a man. I live in Britain, so I can only speak about the typical Anglo-American male. Let’s scrutinize their lives together lol. For those of you who don’t know who that is it’s just a male that resides in either England (Anglo) or America, who adopts the English and or American cultural practices of manhood, usually but not exclusively, Caucasian.
The typical Anglo-American male is emotionally stifled. You are taught to internalize your emotions and to barely even recognize them and not vent in a healthy way. Then something that should have been dealt with or even dare I say cried about eventually just comes out as rage.
You don’t know how feminist you should be. Sometimes men offer their seats to women just to be gentlemanly and they get called out for it because the woman thinks that it is not a man’s place to do that just because she is a woman, she can stand on her own two feet. I’m personally not like that but I understand what the women mean by it.
You are bombarded by unobtainable standards of manhood. Having the right job, Earning the right amount of money. Having the perfect body with chiselled abs. Having your own place. Having your own children who are perfect. A wife who is perfect. A car that is perfect etc. Not everybody is going to be rich, or married or have perfect children.
Traditional gender roles have been blurred and you find this confusing and scary. Now this one is very interesting. With the increase in opportunities and education for women a woman can now do everything a man can. However, this presents itself with a problem in that it forces men to confront their place in society. This is because women’s role in marriage/society is also linked to their biology, only women can carry and give birth to children, so their traditional role as caregivers are justified and tied up in their biology. Men, however, cannot carry young nor can they breastfeed, so traditionally they went out to work and brought the dollar home but now women can do that too. BUTTTT women can encroach upon men”s traditional roles but men cannot encroach upon women’s traditional roles because their biology prohibits it, what I mean is that a man cannot carry or give birth to young or breastfeed etc. Which has your typical Anglo-American male thinking:

“…right so carrying the young for 9 months she can do that but I can’t and breastfeeding and giving birth she can do that but I can’t but it’s ok I can be useful other ways! Errm… ok so bringing in the money riiiight well she can do that as well, going out to work paying the bills ok yeah soooo she can do that too, driving the car, getting educated etc she can do that as wellll, so what exactly is my unique usefulness in society? She can not only do the things that men CAN’T DO but she can ALSO do the things that MEN CAN DO. What am I here for?…Sperm donor?”

Now I’m going to suggest something radical…. I think that men’s role in life is to love Jesus and nurture just like women nurture. I think men should be the opposite of what they are traditionally, stern, money bags, in charge, I think they should be in touch with their emotions and work in order to nurture and pick up the slack to help, not hold that over the women and just to be in charge. If the two sexes were to work together not against each other it would be so much more helpful. I think that encouraging equal opportunities for women is a big part of the nurturing role of men towards society as a whole. They have the social capital to do soo much good and they either waste it or abuse it. According to the 2017 Global Gender Gap Report, published by the World Economic Forum, which benchmarks 144 countries on their progress towards gender parity across four matrices: Economic Participation and Opportunity, Educational Attainment, Health and Survival and Political Empowerment, it will take 217 years for women to achieve parity with men globally. The report states that this is partly due to the widening of the Economic Participation gap, which has reverted back to where it stood in 2008. One key finding of the report is that Western Europe is reported to have a remaining gender gap of 25%, putting that area ahead of North America, which has a remaining gender gap of 28%. The report also goes on to state that a variety of models and empirical studies have suggested that improving gender parity could add an estimated US$250 billion to the GDP of the United Kingdom. One key avenue highlighted for further progress is closing the occupational gender gaps, which the report suggest require adjustments within the education sector, companies and by policy makers, pointing out that fields that, such as the care economy and the emerging technology sector, are losing out on the benefits of diversity (Word Economic Forum 2017, pp.vii-viii)
Some statistics on women’s leadership potential: I don’t want to exhaust you with stats so here’s the highlights:

  • Nordea Bank surveyed nearly 11,000 publicly traded companies over 8 years and found that on average companies with a female CEO or head of the board of directors had a 25% annualised return since 2009 more than double the 11% delivered by the MSCI World Index (Nordea Bank 2017)
  • A Credit Suisse report mapped 27,000 senior managers at over 3000 of the largest companies globally found that greater representation of women in senior leadership roles was linked to excess stock market returns and senior corporate profitability (Credit Suisse 2016)
  • Again, The Credit Suisse Research Institute in 2012 found that companies with women on their boards perform better than companies with all-male boards in challenging markets. Following the 2008 global economic crisis, for example, net income growth for companies with women on their boards averaged 14%, compared with 10% for companies with all-male boards (Credit Suisse 2012).
  • Lastly, a report in 2015, by the McKinsey Global Institute, who, for 95 countries, mapped 15 gender equality indicators, which fall into four categories: Equality In Work, Essential Services and Enablers of Economic Opportunity, Legal Protection and Political Voice and Physical Security and Autonomy, estimated that if a “full potential” scenario, where women participate in the economy identically to men, were realised this could add up to $28 trillion to annual global GDP in 2025. This impact would be roughly equivalent to the size of the combined US and Chinese economies. MGI also established a strong link between egalitarian societies, their attitudes and beliefs about the role of women and gender equality in work. Additionally, just like the 2017 Global Gender Gap Report (2017), published by the World Economic Forum, the McKinsey Global Institute report found that the most progress was needed in the technology and care industries and that the private sector, education sector, governments and NGO’s will need to change in order to bring about gender equality (McKinsey & Company 2015, p.ii). This report also highlights that women are half of the world’s working-age population but only generate 37% of GDP, they are also disproportionately represented in lower-productivity sectors and insufficiently represented in higher-productivity sectors (McKinsey & Company 2015, p.4). Additionally, the report highlights that 75% of the worlds total unpaid work such as: child care, caring for the elderly, cooking and cleaning is done by women, estimating that the unpaid work being undertaken by women today amounts to as much as $10 trillion of output per year, which is roughly equivalent to 13% of global GDP (McKinsey & Company 2015, p.2).

Patriarchy is not in men’s interest, women are primary caregivers due to our capacity to feed, birth and bear young. Men should be protecting and supporting women because they help to protect and support the world, given the same opportunities as men, as the afore mentioned stats show. Women often work in care industries such as teaching, nursing, care-workers, social workers etc. You don’t want somebody who can’t read or write or is unfulfilled or underpaid to be raising the most precious thing the world has, our children, if the women are not encouraged to be strong and educated or supported adequately during and after their pregnancies they will not be equipped to lead and nurture the next generation (which statistics show that they lead and nurture anyway). YOU CAN’T GIVE OUT WHAT YOU DON’T HAVE… We all benefit in the end from the children when they grow up.

Below is a documentary by CNN, you can follow this link to watch it or use the embedded player below:

Don’t forget the song I wrote 2 weeks ago 🙂

Love

Catherine x

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Bibliography

CNN, ‘The Feminist on Cellblock Y’ CNN Web site, at: <https://edition.cnn.com/videos/us/2018/04/18/the-feminist-on-cellblock-y-doc-orig.cnn&gt; 10 May 2018

Credit Suisse Research Institute. 2012. Gender Diversity and Corporate Performance. August. Zurich.

Credit Suisse, ‘The CS Gender 3000: The Reward for Change 2016’ Credit Suisse Web site, at: <http://publications.credit-suisse.com/tasks/render/file/index.cfm?fileid=5A7755E1-EFDD-1973-A0B5C54AFF3FB0AE&gt; 2 March 2018

McKinsey & Company, ‘The Power of Parity: How Advancing Women’s Equality Can Add $12 Trillian To Global Growth September 2015 Executive Summary’ McKinset & Company Web site, at: <https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Global%20Themes/Employment%20and%20Growth/How%20advancing%20womens%20equality%20can%20add%2012%20trillion%20to%20global%20growth/MGI%20Power%20of%20parity_Executive%20summary_September%202015.ashx&gt; 8 March 2018

Nordea Bank, ‘Investing in female CEO’s pays off, 2017’ Nordea Bank Web site, at <https://www.nordea.com/en/press-and-news/news-and-press-releases/news-en/2017/investing-in-female-ceos-pays-off.html&gt; 2 March 2018

World Economic Forum, ‘The Global Gender Gap Report 2017, World Economic Forum Web site, at: <http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GGGR_2017.pdf&gt; 8 March 2018

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